Innojam Las Vegas 2012 – Team One – Mumsy-Book App – Source

Innojam Las Vegas 2012 – Team One – Mumsy-Book App – Source.

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Innojam Las Vegas 2012 – Team One – Mumsy-Book App – Source

The Mumsy-Book App was designed using Codiqa, which is has a drag and drop interface making it easy to design a HTML5 app using jQueryMobile.

You can test the app on-line, then at a later stage export the entire code base as a HTML5 / jQueryMobile project.

Image

The exported code then needs a little modification. The pictures are typically still held on the Codiqa site, so these need to be modified to be local references.

The code then needs modifying to fetch its data from the Hana system, four tables with test data were created on the system. Team one ran out of time during the innoJam, so only one table was actually implemented.

Here is a code sample of how the data is read and applied to the HTML5 code:

The data was read on the page being loaded:

<script>
$(document).bind(‘pageinit’,function(event) {getMembersData()});
</script>

The insertion point within the html5 DOM is here:

<ul id=’members-element-id’ data-role=’listview’ data-divider-theme=’b’ data-inset=’true’></ul>

The data is read record by record become line by line within the application:

<script>
var nopoint = “ooga”;
function getMembersData()
{
// URL for calling getRewardsData function with all parameters.
var airline = “AA”;
var myEndpointUri = “http://192.168.12.3:8000/team01/membersij.xsodata/Members“;
// Send the request and define callback methods.
OData.read( {requestUri:myEndpointUri,user:”team01″,password:”InnoJam2012″}, function (data) {
//Success Callback (Received data is a Feed):
var html = “”;
//html += “<ul data-role=’listview’ data-divider-theme=’b’ data-inset=’true’>”;
html += “<li data-role=’list-divider’ role=’heading’>Individual</li>”;

for (var i = 0; i < data.results.length; i++) {
html += “<li data-theme=’c’> <a href=’#page3′ data-transition=’slide’>”;
html += data.results[i].MEMBER + ” ” + data.results[i].POINTS;
html += “</a> </li>”;
}
//html += “</ul>”;
document.getElementById(“members-element-id”).innerHTML = html;
$(‘#members-element-id’).listview(‘refresh’);
//Assuming your HTML page has DIV element with id ‘target-element-id’
},
function (err) {
//Error Callback:
var spacer = “nothing”;
alert(“Error occurred test – ” + err.message);
}
);
}
</script>

SMES NEED TO GET SERIOUS

.Quocirca has predicted that over a third of small businesses expect more employees to be working from home in the future and about 40% expect more employees to be travelling outside the office with a need to access IT.

This is double the number expected by large enterprises.

Quocirca’s predications show that SMEs are becoming significant stakeholders in the remote working industry.

Remote computing is no longer a luxury, but actually a critical element of the job, particularly for employees such as sales representatives, engineers, nurses or field workers.

Mobile workers are employed for a variety of skills, but are not necessarily IT savvy and certainly not security experts.

Yet, according to a Sybase iAnywhere survey, more than 71% of companies leave the responsibility of securing mobile data in the hands of these users. The disconnect is clear.

For all companies, regardless of size, trusting employees to work remotely is actually a scary concept. Very few employees intentionally introduce viruses or cause their device to stop functioning, however many do it inadvertently simply because of a lack of knowledge and understanding of their devices.

Read More Here

SMES NEED TO GET SERIOUS

.Quocirca has predicted that over a third of small businesses expect more employees to be working from home in the future and about 40% expect more employees to be travelling outside the office with a need to access IT.

This is double the number expected by large enterprises.

Quocirca’s predications show that SMEs are becoming significant stakeholders in the remote working industry.

Remote computing is no longer a luxury, but actually a critical element of the job, particularly for employees such as sales representatives, engineers, nurses or field workers.

Mobile workers are employed for a variety of skills, but are not necessarily IT savvy and certainly not security experts.

Yet, according to a Sybase iAnywhere survey, more than 71% of companies leave the responsibility of securing mobile data in the hands of these users. The disconnect is clear.

For all companies, regardless of size, trusting employees to work remotely is actually a scary concept. Very few employees intentionally introduce viruses or cause their device to stop functioning, however many do it inadvertently simply because of a lack of knowledge and understanding of their devices.

Read More Here

Silverlight Mobile

When O when is this going to happen, I have been waiting a whole year now since the idea was first blogged.

http://reddevnews.com/news/article.aspx?editorialsid=10565

Interesting article especially the foillowing quotes:

Critics have lambasted Microsoft for its slow progress on modernizing its handheld computing platform while rivals have usurped the company in functionality and, in some cases, sales growth.

The criticism comes as Q3 sales of Apple Inc.’s iPhone for the first time exceeded revenues from Windows Mobile devices, according to both Gartner Inc. and IDC. Making matters worse for Microsoft and the Windows Mobile community, the market researchers predict that other platforms, including Google Inc.’s open source Android and Nokia Corp.’s soon-to-be open source Symbian platform, will continue to threaten Microsoft moving forward (though the latter is dominant worldwide, it has a miniscule presence in the United States).

Progress on the Way
Developers are also concerned that Microsoft has been slow to reveal when Windows Mobile 6.1 will take on features that match its rivals’, such as a more modern interface, support for touch and improved Web browsing. Microsoft indicated it plans to shed at least some of that mystery at this month’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. Jay Roxe, group product manager for Windows Mobile, tells RDN Microsoft will officially unveil Windows Mobile 6.5 “very soon.”

Windows Mobile 6.5 will sport an improved user interface with gesture and touch capability and better Web browsing with Internet Explorer Mobile 6. The upgraded browser provides improved JavaScript rendering, support for widgets via AJAX and an integrated Adobe Flash Lite runtime, says Roxe, who transferred from the developer division to the mobile computing business (MCB) group after Microsoft’s Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in October.

Roxe offered little detail in terms of when the first devices based on Windows Mobile 6.5 will ship; nor would he discuss Windows Mobile 7. It’s also unclear when Microsoft’s Silverlight plug-in will be linked to Windows Mobile. Silverlight for Mobile, announced at PDC, is based on Silverlight 2 and expected sometime this year. It will initially support Nokia S60 and Windows Mobile devices, according to Microsoft.

Microsoft will release new APIs for Windows Mobile 6.5, though Roxe declined to elaborate, only indicating that information will be disclosed imminently. When asked about developers’ complaints regarding Microsoft’s lack of communication about its mobile strategy, Roxe insists it will change. 

Why develop Mobile Database Applications?

Mobile database applications are an effective way to streamline business processes and ensure that end users always have access to the critical corporate information they need to do their jobs. Although large enterprises tend to be the ones that invest most heavily in mobility, smaller businesses can also benefit from mobilizing their data.

“Mobile” is Not the Same as “Online”

Rest of article can be found here:

Why Develop Mobile Database Applications?

Breck Carter, Principal Consultant at RisingRoad